Visit to St Albans

At the weekend I visited some friends who have recently moved to St Albans in Hertfordshire. We embarked on a magical mystery historical tour.

Our first stop was Verulamium Park, so called because it lies on the site of the Roman city of Verulamium. It has a pretty lake with ducks and moorhens and on the edge there is a pub, called Ye Olde Fighting Cocks. We didn’t visit the pub on this occasion, but we did have lunch there the last time I visited. Apparently the pub holds the Guinness Book of Records title for being the oldest pub in England.

We walked away from the lake and came to the remains of the City walls and outline of the main London Gate. During the legendary drought of 1976, planes flying overhead could see the outlines of the old Roman city, made visible by the lack of grass, which had withered away in the heat.

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Looking towards the lake at the remains of the London Gate. Apologies for the inconveniently-placed dog waste bin…
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The remains of the London Gate

The Hypocaust Mosaic is nearby, covered by a purpose-built building. It is beautifully preserved and, in one corner, the hypocaust – or method of underfloor heating – can be seen.

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The Hypocaust Mosaic

Following this we visited the nearby Verulamium Museum, containing many objects of everyday life, more mosaics, and a couple of skeletons. It cost £5 to enter which we thought a bit pricey, but there were some interesting things to see. We didn’t go to see the nearby Roman theatre as you had to pay separately to go in, and none of us felt like forking out more!

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Mosaic in Verulamium Museum

Walking back into town, we could see the abbey – officially St Albans Cathedral – in the distance.

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View of St Albans Cathedral

We decided to go inside.

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St Albans Cathedral

The first thing that struck me was the gorgeous ceiling.

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Ceiling
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Another part of the ceiling

The rood screen, known as the Wallingford Screen, dates from around 1480, but the statues date from the Victorian period and are replacements of those destroyed in the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

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Wallingford Screen

This figure – a replica of an original on display in a case elsewhere in the Cathedral – stood above the Poor Box.

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Poor box figure

There were several interesting things to look at, including this skull.

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The shrine of St Alban still draws pilgrims to the abbey. Alban died around 300 AD; he lived in Verulamium and the story goes that he gave shelter to a Christian priest, who converted him. Alban changed clothes with the priest, who escaped, and died in his stead.

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Shrine of St Alban
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Shrine of St Alban

This ancient structure was designed so that priests could watch over the shrine constantly.

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The Cathedral is unique in having very good and visible wall paintings, relics of the pre-Reformation days, which incredibly survived the Dissolution.

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I loved this gorgeous window.

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The Cathedral
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The Cathedral

Finally, we visited the Museum of St Albans. This was a free museum and we both enjoyed it. My friend was impressed when she found her street mentioned on one of the information boards. My favourite thing was the stocks: you could put your head and hands through and be pelted by (cloth) fruit and vegetables. Hours of fun!

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Museum building

St Albans is a nice place to visit if you want a bit of history. There are some lovely pubs too, and I definitely want to climb the tower when it reopens in the spring.

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