Jewellery brand of the month: Sstutter

I’m back in the UK for my next brand, the amazing:

SSTUTTER

Sstutter is one of the most unique acrylic jewellery brands out there. It is the brand of Phil Wykes, who designs and makes each piece. Each design is usually produced in one or more limited-edition colourways.

This beautiful Monarch Butterfly necklace in the Magenta Jewel colourway is definitely going to be my first purchase.

Monarch butterfly necklace - magenta jewel

For something a bit more delicate, the Hummingbird, available as either a pendant or a brooch, is ideal. This is the Flowers colourway.

Hummingbird - flowers

The Owl necklace is available in a number of colourways; this Onyx version reminds me of the owl in Labyrinth.

owl necklace - onyx

The animal heads are really popular: I like this Snow White version of the cat necklace.

Cat necklace - snow white

Finally, this statement Crocodile Necklace is an utter masterpiece. It is available in pink and this Gold Jewel colourway.

Statement crocodile necklace - gold jewel

Find Sstutter at the following locations:

Website: sstutter.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/sstutteruk

Facebook: facebook.com/sstutter

The Lord of The Rings Trilogy – Prince Charles Cinema

Lord of the Rings screening

It’s been several years since I’ve seen the Lord of the Rings trilogy, so I thought it would be a good time to refresh my memory. The Prince Charles Cinema holds all-night marathons every December, and I went along armed with snacks and energy drinks.

The marathon featured all three films, in extended editions, over a period of more than twelve hours with minimal breaks. It was less of an endurance test than I’d expected (the energy drinks helped), because the movies are so good, and still hold up well twenty years after they were first made. Boromir’s “One does not simply walk into Mordor” line got a particular laugh.

When the final credits rolled I went for a Wetherspoon’s breakfast and went back home, where I spent the whole day sleeping.

Prince Charles Cinema

Ramin Karimloo and the Broadgrass Band at The Other Palace

My second Ramin Karimloo gig in a year – truly, I have been spoiled. This gig rounded off 2019 nicely, in the intimate surroundings of The Other Palace.

Ramin sang lots of Broadgrass-style songs as well as songs from his latest album, From Now On, and other musical hits. No matter how many times I see him live, I am always left wanting more.

Throughout the show, Ramin kept hinting about an exciting forthcoming announcement. It turns out that he will be starring in a concert production of the musical The Secret Garden at the Palladium next spring. That is definitely going on my list!

George IV: Art & Spectacle – Queen’s Gallery

George IV painting

George IV: Art & Spectacle is the latest exhibition to take place at the Queen’s Gallery, London. This king, who spent many years as Prince Regent (giving the Regency period its name) before taking the throne in his own right, is portrayed here as a keen art collector whose legacy can still be seen today.

Growing up, George was not allowed to leave the country owing to the orders of his father, George III, so instead he collected works of art from all over Europe and the east, as well as paintings of subjects closer to home – his family, and earlier monarchs. His energies were first directed at Carlton House, his London residence, which he filled with art, sculpture and furniture, but his vision eventually outgrew this comparatively small living space. Famously, he established the Royal Pavilion in Brighton, and on becoming king he instigated work at Windsor Castle and Buckingham House, transforming the latter, under the care of architect Thomas Nash, into Buckingham Palace.

It seems that George did have a keen eye: he collected works by the likes of Rembrandt, as well as commissioning works of his own. He enjoyed literature too, keeping a collection of Jane Austen’s works in each of his residences, and inviting Sir Walter Scott to dine.

One thing I found interesting about the exhibition was that George, spending money lavishly at a time of economic hardship for many of his subjects, was widely disliked, and this image of him has coloured our perception. I’m not really surprised, and it makes me wonder if having this exhibition now was really a good choice, as poverty levels in the UK reach crisis point. Not long ago, there was criticism over a plan to refurbish Buckingham Palace during this time of austerity, and however much George IV embraced the arts, I feel similarly about his own spending, fascinating as this exhibition was.